big apples

The 9 Big Apples In Australia

The nine Big Apples of Australia are giant apple structures found in different locations across the country. Here’s a summary of everything you need to know about these iconic apple sculptures.

he Big Apple in Thulimbah
The Big Apple in Thulimbah, Queensland Source: Creative Commons
 

The Big Apple in Batlow

This Big Apple in Batlow, NSW is found in the middle of an apple orchard just three kilometres north of Batlow, a South West Slopes town on the Great Dividing Range edge. The big apple’s location has no public access, with its visibility blocked by the large apple trees surrounding it. The apple’s only visible feature is its top, which is seen from Batlow- Tumut Road.

The Big Apple in Tallong

This oversized apple sculpture is found in Tallong, a small town in New South Wales, which holds an annual festival known as Apple Day. The exact location of the Big Apple in Tallong is at Jim Watling Park on Caoura Road. Following its demolition some years ago, the big apple in Tallong was restored in 2016 in preparation for the Apple Day festival.

The Yerrinbool Big Apple

The big apple in Yerrinbool in NSW is visible from the Hume Highway, a major intercity highway in Australia, southwest of Sydney.

Big Apple in Yerrinbool
Big Apple in Yerrinbool Source: Creative Commons

Yerrinbool is a small village in Wingecarribee Shire, accessible through the Hume Highway via Bargo or Alpine. This village is known for the large-scale production of apples and the famous Tennessee Orchard (pictured).

The Big Apple In Thulimbah

A local artist named Johnny Ross crafted this 13 ft by 15 ft steel and fibreglass apple sculpture in 1978. Initially, it was based at a petrol station in Thulimbah, Queensland. It was then moved to a new location, opposite Suttons Apple Orchard & Cidery at Vincenzo along the New England Highway.

The Big Apple in Acacia Ridge

This giant apple sculpture is located along Beaudesert Road at Acacia Ridge. Acacia Ridge is a southern suburb in Brisbane, Queensland with a population of 7429 people, according to the 2016 census.

The Big Apple in Spreyton

This massive apple sculpture sits in Spreyton, a small local town in Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. It draws attention to Spreyton Fresh, a family-owned fruit and juices business. According to the 2016 census, the town had a population of 1699 residents.

The Bacchus Marsh Big Apple

This gigantic apple sculpture previously sat next to a dumpster behind a fence in Bacchus Marsh, a local urban centre in Victoria, Australia. Unfortunately, the structure was removed from its location after the closure of an adjacent fruit shop. A concrete version has replaced the original version, but it is not as big.

The Big Apple In Gladysdale

The giant fibreglass apple hangs on a pole in front of the Gladysdale Primary School. The school hosts the Gladysdale Apple and Wine Festival every year. The massive apple structure was restored at its current site by a local builder and engineer in the 2014 Gladysdale Apple and Wine Festival on May 4, 2014, after sustaining multiple damages from vandals.

The Big Apple In Donnybrook

The impressive structure stands 23 ft high with a width of 13 ft. This apple is located at Donnybrook, Western Australia the centre of apple production in Western Australia’s. The town is situated on the Southern Western Highway between Kirup and Boyanup.

The Big Apples in Donnybrook
The Big Apples in Donnybrook Source: Creative Commons

To celebrate apple farming, the town of Donnybrook hosts the annual Donnybrook Apple Festival during Easter. The event is usually held at Egan Park, and includes agricultural displays, concerts, fireworks display, street parades, among other interesting and exciting activities.

At the street parade, the Catholic Church of Donnybrook blesses the holy apple. This ceremony assures good returns in the next harvesting season.

If you loved reading about the Big Apples, we are pleased to inform you that there many other Big Things in Australia worth checking out on our blog. You can also join our mailing list to stay updated with everything to do with the Big Things of Australia.

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